Medical Schools that Accept International Students

The medical school admissions process is competitive enough as it is! But as an international applicant, it’s even harder. There’s a limited number of medical schools in the US that accept or even interview international students. A good place to start making your list if you are an international student is to understand which MD schools even interview international applicants. This list below should help you as it lists medical schools that interview and eventually accept international students.

Interviews for International Medical School Applicants

School Name Number of International Students Interviewed
Wayne State University School of Medicine 93
Boston University School of Medicine 68
Georgetown University School of Medicine 65
Saint Louis University School of Medicine 54
Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine 52
Harvard Medical School 49
West Virginia University School of Medicine 48
Yale School of Medicine 43
Weill Cornell Medical College 41
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine 38
University of Virginia School of Medicine 36
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 34
Northwestern University The Feinberg School of Medicine 34
Stanford University School of Medicine 31
University of Kentucky College of Medicine 29
University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine 28
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 27
Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons 26
New York Medical College 22
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of yeshiva University 21
Emory University School of Medicine 21
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth 21
New York University School of Medicine 21
Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science 20
University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences The Pritzker School of Medicine 20
Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine 19
Loma Linda University School of Medicine 18
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine 18
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry 16
Duke University School of Medicine 15
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai 15
Stony Brook University School of Medicine 15
George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences 12
Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania 12
Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University 12
Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine 11
Howard University College of Medicine 9
State University of New York Upstate Medical University 9
University of California, Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine 9
University of Maryland School of Medicine 8
Creighton University School of Medicine 7
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas Southwestern Medical School 6
Mayo Medical School 5
University of Utah School of Medicine 5
Medical College of Wisconsin 4
Michigan State University College of Human Medicine 4
Rutgers, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School 4
Tulane University School of Medicine 4
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University 3
University of California, Davis, School of Medicine 3
University of Connecticut School of Medicine 3

Differences Between MD (AMCAS) and DO (AACOMAS) Applications

If you are applying to medical school, you maybe applying to both DO and MD schools. While the applications are relatively similar, there are a few differences in character counts/limits for the DO application to keep in mind while you are drafting your essays and activities sections! Here’s a real quick guide for your review that highlights the differences!

Application Personal Statement Character Limit Activities Character Limit Most Meaningful Activity Limits
MD (AMCAS) 5300 characters (including spaces) 700 characters (including spaces) 3 can be selected as a most meaningful activity. You’ll have an additional 1325 characters for these
DO (AACOMAS) 4500 characters (including spaces) 600 characters (including spaces)  Not applicable

As always, if you need help through your MD or DO application, MedSchoolCoach is here!

What Is the Best Pre-Med Major?

Choosing a major can be one of the most stressful things for a college student to do! I talked to hundreds of early students who wonder what the “best major” for a premed is. That’s a loaded questions with all kinds of different possible answers. There is no single best “premed major”. It really depends on each individual scenario, but I wanted to outline a few key concepts that everyone should consider when choosing a major as a premedical student.

  • Non-science majors can be attractive to medical school

    Biology major. Biology major. Biochemistry major. Biology major. That’s your typical stack of medical school applicants. Imagine if you could insert something really interesting in there like “Beatles, Popular Music and Society”. Okay, that maybe extreme, but the idea would be that you would be a great science student who get’s A’s in all your premed classes, does science research and volunteers at hospitals but also brings a completely unique major to the table.

  • The premed curriculum is stacked, so plan ahead

    There are a lot of great majors out there that have nothing to do with science or medicine. They may make you a really attractive candidate to medical schools because you bring a whole new perspective to the incoming class. I always encourage people to major in non-science fields, however you have to keep the premed curriculum in mind when you decide to do so. And with the new MCAT coming out in 2015, there are even more courses added to the mix. Remember, every premedical student has to take the classes below. That’s a lot of classes! In fact, it’s over 18 courses. With each semester in college allowing you to take 4-5 classes, the premed curriculum could take up as much as 50% of your coursework. That becomes difficult with certain majors that have no overlap with the premedical curriculum, so you should make sure to plan ahead if you are going to choose a non-science major.

    1. Biology 1 and 2 plus lab
    2. Inorganic chemistry 1 and 2 plus lab
    3. Organic Chemistry 1 and 2 plus lab
    4. Physics 1 and 2 plus lab
    5. Two semesters of Math
    6. Two semesters of English
    7. Physcology
    8. Sociology
    9. Biochemistry (some schools)
  • Remember that your GPA is incredibly important

    One factor that premeds overlook too often when choosing a major is how they will be able to maintain a great GPA. Remember, your GPA is incredibly important in your premed process! If you are a biomedical engineering major with a 3.2 GPA versus an english major with a 4.0 GPA, the 4.0 wins out every day of the week, despite the potentially more difficult curriculum of a biomedical engineer! You should keep in mind your ability to succeed and maintain a great GPA in the major you choose.

  • Major in something that interests you!

    You should major in something that you are interested in. You will spend 4 years dedicating yourself to classes in your major. You better enjoy it! If you don’t, your grades will suffer. And even if you are planning to go to medical school, college is a time where you can really learn about something different from medicine. It’s amazing how little what you learn in college will be a part of your everyday life as a physician, no matter what major you are, so it’s great if you can diversify yourself!  If you are passionate about film as well as medicine, be a non-traditional premed who majors in film. If you really are mainly interested in the sciences, don’t be afraid to go for the traditional life science majors.

Finding the perfect major also involves understanding your undergraduate institutions curriculum, requirements and pathways. So you need to take into account many of these factors when you decide what you want to major in!

Can You Negotiate a Medical School Scholarship?

When you receive a medical school acceptance, you are elated, and rightfully so! You’ve worked a tremendous amount to get to the point of being accepted and are now on your way to becoming a physician!

Except, there’s one potentially crippling hurdle in the way: tuition. You’ve probably seen the numbers: many medical students graduate with over $200,000 in debt. It’s certainly not easy to finance medical school nor to leave medical school with so much debt.

Luckily, most students qualify for some sort of financial aid. Whether those are grants from the government or scholarships, your initial tuition sticker shock may be lowered just a little bit. For a select few, there are honors scholarships that can almost pay your entire tuition.

A question that often comes up is if a student can use one scholarship offer to “negotiate” with another school. The short answer is YES, absolutely! Now, I’ve had a student who was actually been on the waitlist at a top 5 medical school, but got into another school (“lesser” ranked) with a full scholarship. Not only did he get off the waitlist at the top 5 school, he got a full tuition ride! How, a well timed and strategically placed letter or phone call to the powers that be can certainly get a school to rethink their offer to an individual applicant.

Bottom line, you absolutely can use one schools offer to talk with another school. You can send an email outlining something along the lines of:

“Dear Dr. _____,

Thank you so much again for the chance to matriculate at University of _______. I couldn’t be happier or more excited to have this opportunity!

As I make my final decisions for medical school, obviously cost is one of the factors I am considering. While I absolutely love your school, the X College of Medicine has actually offered me a full tuition scholarship (see attached).  While tuition costs is certainly not the only factor determining my decision, I wanted to understand where I stood for potential financial aid/scholarships at University of ______. I’d love to discuss more with you over the phone or even in person soon!

I hope to hear from you. Thank you again!

Student”

A simple letter like this can go a long way in a potential acceptance and a scholarship offer!